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Diabetes Devices Up Close: The Eversense E3

Eversense E3

If you follow the Skin Grip blog, you may have noticed our new deep dives into diabetes devices, such as the Dexcom G6 or the Abbott Freestyle Libre. Each month, we cover devices in-depth— their special features, how they work, and how you can start the process of acquiring one. This month, we examine the Eversense E3, one of the most unique diabetes devices on the market.

What is the Eversense E3?

The Eversense E3 is a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) which can measure blood glucose levels every five minutes. This frequent measuring interval allows patients to have constant updates on their blood sugar throughout the day, facilitating diabetes management. Additionally, the device can record trends over time by tracking movement in blood glucose levels throughout each day and saving that data for later analysis.

The E3 is the most recent iteration of the Eversense device. While old models were approved to remain in place for 180 days, the E3 can be used for up to six months. Reports also indicate that Eversense is working to extend that time to a full year as soon as possible, though testing and FDA approval are necessary before that can happen. In the meantime, the Eversense E3 only needs replacing twice a year, unlike other CGMs, which need replacing at least twice a month.

How does it work?

While most CGMs are inserted onto the skin by users, the Eversense E3 stands alone as the only CGM which is inserted under the skin and remains there for up to six months. The device is inserted as a sterile procedure in a doctor’s office, where an incision is made, and the device is placed in the upper arm. The wound is then sealed with dressings to keep the incision site clean while it heals. After a few days of healing, the device can be paired with a wireless transmitter that is attached to the arm with an adhesive bandage. The transmitter then sends data collected by the internal sensor to your smartphone app.

How do I use this device?

The sensor itself requires very little care beyond replacement. Unlike other CGMs, sensors are removed and replaced by healthcare professionals with special training to perform the procedure. Users are responsible for keeping the wireless transmitter charged, attached to their arm, and calibrated with their smartphone app. The transmitter is attached with adhesive bandages, such as Tegaderm. Skin Grip’s dhesive patches a can also be used to secure the Eversense E3’s transmitter firmly in place. Our tape rolls work great, too.

The Eversense E3’s smartphone app is used as the primary display for the device, which shows the user’s blood glucose level, the current trend (whether it is rising or falling and how quickly) in blood glucose, and charts showing blood glucose levels over time. The app is also used to calibrate the transmitter and sensor, which must be done with a traditional finger stick twice daily for the first three weeks of use. Like many other CGMs, the Eversense E3 provides alerts when blood glucose reaches unsafe levels.

How much does it cost?

The cost of an Eversense system can depend on insurance coverage and financial aid eligibility, but some estimates put the cost of the Eversense at approximately $3,000 per year, including the system and semiannual doctor’s visits.

Will a CGM get in the way of daily activities?

A CGM shouldn’t preclude people with type 1 diabetes from any activity, though some care may be necessary to protect your medical devices. The Eversense E3’s sensor is inside the body, so it is protected from the elements, but the transmitter requires care. Though the transmitter is water-resistant, it will not withstand submersion for very long. Additionally, users must be sure to keep it secure, as it is necessary for the system to function.

An adhesive overpatch is a great way to protect CGMs. Skin Grip’s patches are specifically designed to protect diabetes devices, such as the Dexcom G6, Freestyle Libre, and Medtronic Guardian sensors. Additionally, they can keep Eversense E3 transmitters securely fastened. Skin Grip’s overlay patches keep people with diabetes active and worry-free, whether they’re showering, dancing, or getting pumped at the gum.

How can I get one?

The Eversense E3 can be obtained here and checking your eligibility with their care representatives. Like other CGM devices, a prescription will be required from a healthcare provider. These representatives can also assist potential users in investigating financial aid and cost-saving steps.

At Skin Grip We are constantly teaming up with influencers and voices in the diabetes community to design new products, content, and charitable giving opportunities. We even allow our users to choose which diabetes charity we donate to each month in our A11 for 1 program. Skin Grip is a company that isn’t just about making great products for people with CGMs, but helping everyone with diabetes break through limitations. If you have an Eversense E3 device, we look forward to helping you maximize its use so you can live fearlessly.

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